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STA FM Rural News | 29-06-2024

by | Jun 29, 2024 | Rural | 0 comments

Inverell Cattle Sale – Tuesday 25h June – Total yarding 676 head.

Numbers halved for a yarding of 676 head, consisting mainly of weaner and yearling cattle and there was a good supply of cows.  

Quality was very mixed although there were several pens of well-bred young cattle through the sale.   

The market saw well-bred cattle sell firm to a dealer trend; however plainer type cattle were easier.

Restocker weaner steers sold from 250c to 398c, while restocker weaner heifers ranged from 222c to 266c/kg. 

Feeder steers sold according to quality ranging from 284c to 376c, while feeder heifers sold from 312c to 328c/kg. 

There was only a few grown steers offered toping at 256c and grown heifers sold to 268c/kg. 

Heavy cows were 5c dearer selling from 188c to 220c/kg. 

There was a large number of plain cows penned, most went to restockers selling from 124c to 182c/kg.  

Report compiled by Doug Robso

ROMA STORE SALE MONDAY JUNE 25

8274 HEAD SOLD –. MOST CATEGORIES LOST GROUND WITH OPPORTUNE RESTOCKERS THE MAJOR BUYERS.

YEARLING STEERS C2 SCORE
200 TO 280 KGS SOLD TO 398 TO AVERAGE 340 OR $837                                                                  
280 TO 330 KGS SOLD TO 372 TO AVERAGE 325                                                                                  
330 TO 400 KGS SOLD TO 350 TO AVERAGE 322                                                                                  
OVER 400 KGS SOLD TO 338 TO AVERAGE 323                                                                                     
YEARLING HEIFERS C2 SCORE
200 TO 280 KGS SOLD TO 278 TO AVERAGE 245                              
280 TO 330 KGS SOLD TO 298 TO AVERAGE 255                                                                                  
330 TO 400 KGS SOLD TO 294 TO AVERAGE 263                                                                               
OVER 400 KGS SOLD TO 294 TO AVERAGE 267                                                                            
COWS UNDER 520 KGS                                                                                                                     
D2 COWS SOLD TO 210 TO AVERAGE 173
D3 COWS SOLD TO 240 TO AVERAGE 235
COWS OVER 520 KGS
D3 COWS SOLD TO 248 TO AVERAGE 225 OR $1264                                                                
BULLS OVER 600 KGS SOLD TO 256 TO AVERAGE 241 OR $266
                                                                                                                                                                      

THIS IS CHARLES WEYMAN JONES IN ROMA, REPORTING FOR RESONATE REGIONAL RADIO

Legislation to ban live sheep export trade passes the lower house.

Labor’s controversial Export Control Amendment (Ending Live Sheep Exports by Sea) Bill 2024 has passed the House of Representatives with the Senate now being the last remaining barrier to stop the phaseout of the industry from entering into law.

Agriculture Minister Murray Watt said on Wednesday that the passage of the bill marked “a considerable step forward for animal welfare” and would boost Australia’s onshore sheep meat processing sector.

However, the farm lobby has been ramping up pressure for an Upper House showdown in urging the Senate crossbench to call an inquiry into Labor’s proposed ban.

It is understood that a delegation of industry stakeholders and representatives of the Keep the Sheep campaign will be in Canberra early next week to meet with Independents and minor parties to argue why a senate inquiry was needed to dissect the bill.

Mr Watt also foreshadowed the likelihood of a Senate inquiry into the bill during a recent Senate Estimates hearing.

As it stands, a Senate inquiry will likely be called however the Greens will hold the balance of power and its leader in the Senate, Mehreen Faruqi, wants the phase-out fast-tracked to 2026.

The means the industry will be relying on the support of several Independents, such as David Pocock and Jacqui Lambie, to block the passage of the legislation.

Senate sheep ban inquiry ruled out after vote falls agonisingly short

Labor’s controversial Export Control Amendment (Ending Live Sheep Exports by Sea) Bill 2024 will likely now pass into law after a vote to hold a Senate inquiry into the legislation fell just short.

Nationals Senator Bridget McKenzie moved a motion on Thursday for the bill to be immediately referred to the Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport Legislation Committee for an inquiry and report by November 25 this year.

However, 33 Senators voted against a probe while 31 voted for it to be held.

Senators exchanged barbs during the vote, with shouts of “shame” and “East Coast Labor doesn’t care” about farmers, “dirty deals” with the Greens and “bring on the election” audible across the chamber.

Top quality farming country sold for in excess of $6000 an acre

Top quality 809 hectare (1999 acre) North West NSW farming property Kalua has sold at auction for $13.6 million – about $16,811/ha ($6803/acre).

Located in the tightly held Pallamallawa district 42km north east of Moree, there were three active bidders at the auction.

The sale represents a substantial step up in values.

Farming country in the favoured Pallamallawa/Croppa Creek area had previously been selling for more than $14,000 an arable hectare.

Kalua has 752ha (1858 acres) of cultivation and was offered with a 597ha barley crop and 155ha of faba beans.

Kalua features self mulching clay soils, well suited to both summer and winter crops.

Supermarket Enquiry described as a diversion.

The federal Government’s supermarket pricing inquiry is just a “smoke screen”.

That’s according to Victorian Farmers Federation president Emma Germano who, along with Australian Competition and Consumer Commission deputy chair Mick Keogh, were guest speakers at last Friday’s Farm Writers’ Association of NSW lunch in Sydney.

As well as being president of the VFF, Ms Germano runs a mixed farming operation which produces horticulture products and sheep and beef.

And while she has “enjoyed bashing up the supermarkets”, Ms Germano said while addressing the 150-strong audience, the cost-of-living crisis can’t be put solely at their feet.

She said There is no question the supermarkets have played a major role in how successful my business can be.

Ms Germano said What’s been really interesting is the commentary coming out about the supermarkets has largely been from a lot of people who are not necessarily direct suppliers to them.

The Australian Hereford Society has appointed a new CEO

One of the nation’s most senior red meat industry leaders has been appointed to take over the role of chief executive officer at Herefords Australia Limited.

Alastair James will finish as CEO of the Red Meat Advisory Council on August 2 and take up his new position with Herefords Australia on AugustLabor’s controversial

State Budget highlights big plans for water buybacks.

Despite the majority of water funding included in last week’s State budget coming from the Commonwealth, the NSW Government appears committed to delivering its Murray-Darling Basin Plan commitments.

The Australian Government has committed a total of $446 million in funding for the Sustainable Diversion Limit Adjustment Mechanism (SDLAM) acceleration program with $351.4m to be spent in the financial years 2024-25 to 2026-27.

NSW is delivering 21 Sustainable Diversion Limit Adjustments Mechanism projects, with 12 either complete or in operation with project finalisation pending.

Five of the projects have received an additional $115m in funding earlier this year and it is these five which the $351.4m will be spent on to have them completed by the end of 2026.

The government has said these projects will “modernise and refurbish infrastructure, enable more targeted river water delivery, boost aquatic and riparian habitats, provide improved fish passage, reinstate flows, generate local jobs, and provide better conditions for First Nations cultural activities”.

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