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STA FM Rural News | 22-06-2024

by | Jun 22, 2024 | Rural | 0 comments

Inverell Cattle Sale – Tuesday 18th June – Total yarding 1,366 head

There was a a larger yarding of 1,366 head which was a increase of 327, consisting of a good supply of young cattle and a larger penning of cows.  

Grown steers and heifers were in smaller numbers.  

The yarding of young cattle consisted of several pens of weaners however, yearling cattle made the largest percentage of the young cattle yarding.  

Quality was mixed with some good runs of well bred steers and heifers through the sale, along with a few pens of plainer grades.  

The market varied considerably again this week with breed and weight determining the outcome in prices.  

Restocker weaner steers were 10c to 20c cheaper selling from 182c to 360c while restocker weaner heifers were back by 10c selling from 212c to 290c/kg. 

Feeder steers were firm to slightly easier, with weight and breed once again having a bearing on prices, selling firm to slightly easier, ranging from 260c to 376c/kg.  

Yearling heifers went against the market trend with increased buyer competition helping to keep prices relatively firm. 

Feeder heifers ranged from 240c to 312c.kg. 

The yarding of export cattle consisted of a mixed quality offering with the small penning of grown steers reaching a top price of 260c to process and heifers toped at 220c/kg.  

The larger yarding of cows consisted of several pens of heavy well finished cows, however there was increased numbers of plain cows through the sale this week.  

The market was back by 20c for heavy cows, with plainer grades affected the most.  

The 2 score cows sold from 128c to 184c, while 3 scores averaged 188c and heavy 4 score cows ranged from 186c to 215c/kg.  

Report compiled by Doug Robson

Inverell Sheep & Lamb sale Tuesday 18th June – Total yarding 1,286.

There was a small yarding of 1,286 sheep consisting of 519 sheep and 767 lambs.  

Quality was mixed, although there were several pens of well finished lambs through the sale. 

The market saw little change from last week’s sale with trade weight lambs selling from $128 to $142 while heavy lambs sold from $195 to $215/head.  Dorper lambs sold to $195/head.  

The few pens of mutton held firm toping at $88/head.  Doug Robson

DALBY CATTLE SALE WEDNESDAY JUNE 19

4638 HEAD SOLD YESTERDAY. NOT ALL PROCESSORS WERE OPERATING MAKING THE MARKET HARDER. RESTOCKERS WERE THE FORCE IN THE MARKET.

YEARLING STEERS C2 SCORE
200 TO 280 KGS SOLD TO 386 TO AVERAGE 341 OR $889 280 TO 330 KGS SOLD TO 374 TO AVERAGE 337
330 TO 400 KGS SOLD TO 366 TO AVERAGE 329
OVER 400 KGS SOLD TO 344 TO AVERAGE 309

YEARLING HEIFERS C2 SCORE

200 TO 280 KGS SOLD TO 282 TO AVERAGE 233 280 TO 330 KGS SOLD TO 256 TO AVERAGE 240 330 TO 400 KGS SOLD TO 294 TO AVERAGE 249 OVER 400 KGS SOLD TO 318 TO AVERAGE 278

COWS UNDER 520 KGS

D2 COWS SOLD TO 180 TO AVERAGE 156

COWS OVER 520 KGS

D2 COWS SOLD TO 198 TO AVERAGE 178
D3 COWS SOLD TO 215 TO AVERAGE 187
D4 COWS SOLD TO 201 TO AVERAGE 197 OR $1098

BULLS OVER 600 KGS SOLD TO 215 TO AVERAGE 195 OR $1643

There are proposed changes to the boundary for the Federal seat of Parkes.

Under the proposed redistribution of electoral boundaries for NSW, the Parkes electorate will once again grow with the addition of three new local government areas.

The Australian Electoral Commission (AEC) announced on Friday its 2024 redistribution proposal for NSW.

This proposal will see the Division of Parkes expand to include the Blaney, Forbes, and Parkes Shire councils while losing the remainder of the Gwydir Shire to the Division of New England.

Federal Member for Parkes Mark Coulton said the changes were manageable.

Mr Coulton says Overall, the proposed redistribution is not a bad result for the electorate of Parkes – we’re gaining some strong towns in Parkes, Forbes, and West Wyalong, which I’m sure will only add to this great electorate.

He says he is sorry to see the upper half of the Gwydir Shire, which includes his hometown of Warialda, moving to the New England electorate,

“That means that once I retire at the next election, I will no longer live in the Parkes electorate, which is personally disappointing, having represented this electorate for so long and been so invested in it.

How many cattle are there in Australia?

The story of how many beef cattle are there in Australia’s paddocks has taken a twist with government statistics experts shaking up their say on the matter.

The Australian Bureau of Statistics, having changed its methodology, is now suggesting the herd is much bigger.

Its revised estimate of the herd for the 2023 financial year is 27.8 million head, a jump of 3.4m head on the 2022 figure.

That would make it the largest the herd has been in five years but at least a reasonable percentage of that can be accounted for in the fact the ABS is now counting smaller producers whose turnover has not reached $40,000, something it did not do before.

The other changes the ABS has implemented include abandoning beef producer surveys and the use of an ongoing red meat statistics working group with other government and industry people involved, in order to access more data sources.

The new ABS figure lines up far closer with Meat & Livestock Australia estimates, which had the herd at 28.6m for the same period.

There is now only a 4pc difference between these two key organisations, but they still remain a fair distance from other forecasters, some of whom put the herd at more than a million head smaller.

It’s this discrepancy that seems to be causing the most angst among cattle breeders and traders as it means there is a question of whether the herd is rebuilding or liquidating.

Those two directions have significant implications for what the market is likely to do.

The NSW Government has committed almost a $ Billion to biosecurity.

The State Government has committed $945.7m across the next four years for biosecurity, most of which is already allocated in Local Land Services and NSW Department of Primary Industries budgets.

The biosecurity funding incorporates already announced initiatives including.

$55.3m for the eradication of red imported fire ants, $36.2m to manage Varroa mite, $25m to boost frontline surveillance and preventative capabilities, $13.1m for the Feral Pig and Other Pest Management Control programs, $10.4m for the Weeds Action Program, $6.2m to target White Spot disease, $5.8m to continue the Good Neighbour Program, and the appointment of an Independent Biosecurity Commissioner.

The LLS received a 12.3 per cent increase in funding, rising from $260.6m in 2023-24 to $292.7m for the next financial year.

Rural Assistance Authority funding was cut from $861.4m to $72m, down 91.6pc.

A big turnout at Tamworth ag careers day.

An initiative to introduce school students to potential career opportunities in agriculture is proving a success if the turn-out at a recent event at Tamworth is anything to go by.

The Tamworth and District Career Advisors Network (TADCAN) Agricultural Careers Expo was held recently at Farrer Memorial Agricultural High School, Tamworth.

It is the sixth biannual event, and included hands-on workshops, demonstrations and events, such as dog trials, sheep shearing, wood chopping, drone flying, farrier work and helicopter pilots.

More than 1200 students travelled from as far away as Tenterfield, the coast and from further west to learn about agricultural career pathways, employer opportunities, tertiary providers and industry experts.

An Australian has ended up on the podium at the World Young Shepherds competition.

Gabby Horton, a 25-years-old Yass stockwoman recently competed in the World Young Shepherds competition and finished as the top female and second overall.

The competition bought together 28 competitors from 19 countries with strong sheep farming traditions, including Argentina, Canada, Chile, Togo, Belgium, France and the UK.

The competition involved six tasks, all held on different farms across rural France, with the final presentation held at Bergerie Nationale in Rambouillet, an agricultural training centre and model sheep farm with a history dating back to Louis XVI.

The tasks included shearing, foot pairing, lamb fat scoring, drafting, a ewe health assessment and an electric fencing challenge.

The question is being asked – how high will lamb prices go this winter?

Stronger competition from local butchers and processors across all weight ranges has had the good fortune of pushing up lamb prices at most sales in the past fortnight.

NSW trade lambs lifted about nine cents a kilogram (carcase weight), but were up a hefty 50c/kg on the same time last month.

The NSW Trade Lamb Indicator was on 724c/kg on Tuesday.

Unlike young cattle, which continue to trend around last year’s figures, lambs are now trading above the price level of last year. The average trade lamb price on Tuesday was nearly 160c/kg better than the mid-June 2023 figure.

Export lambs were also in demand and the NSW Heavy Lamb Indicator lifted another 6c/kg to settle on 712c/kg.

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