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STA FM Rural News | 15-06-2024

by | Jun 15, 2024 | Rural | 0 comments

Inverell Cattle Sale – Tuesday 11th June – Total 1039 – +604

Numbers increased by 604 for a yarding of 1,039 head consisting of a good supply of young cattle and cows were also well supplied, while there was a small penning of grown steers, and there were several pens of grown heifers.   

The yarding of young cattle consisted of a larger percentage of weaners and light yearlings, however there was several pens of heavy yearling steers and heifers suitable for feeders. 

Quality was fairly good with several runs of well finished and well bred young cattle offered, along with some plainer cattle through the sale.  The market varied considerably with buyers selective with their purchases. 

Light weaners and light yearlings were most affected, while the heavier end of the yearling steers and heifers that were suitable for entry to the feed lots sold strongly.

Restocker weaner steers ranged from 245c to 400c, while restocker weaner heifers ranged from 208c to 312c/kg. 

Light yearling steers to backgrounders sold firm to 20c cheaper depending on breed ranging from 244c to 398c, while heavier feeder steers were 8c dearer selling from 312c to 388c/kg. 

Feeder heifers were back by 10c selling from 280c to 318c/kg. 

The yarding of export cattle saw grown steers sell slightly easier toping at 265c, while grown heifers toped at 280c/kg. 

The cow market held generally firm with 3 score cows averaging 196c while heavy 4 score cows sold from 190c to a top of 235c/kg.

Inverell Sheep & Lamb Sale Tuesday 11th June – Total 3017 – – 287

There was a yarding of 1,723 lambs consisting of a good supply of heavy and trade weights, and a limited number of light lambs. 

Quality was good with the largest percentage of lambs well finished.   

The market was strong with trade weights ranging from $120 to  $150 and heavy lambs sold from $160 to $178 while extra heavy lambs reached a top price of $230/head. 

Dorper lambs top at $195 and hoggets sold to $95/head. 

The good quality yarding of 1,294 head of mutton consisted mainly of ewes. 

The market was stronger compared to the sale two weeks ago with ewes selling from $30 to $100 and the few wethers toped at $85/head. 

Please be advised that IRLX Sheep & Lamb Sale dates for 2024 have changed.

The next Sheep & Lamb sale will be held next Tuesday 18th June, and then fortnightly thereafter 

ROMA STORE SALE TUESDAY JUNE 11

8171 HEAD SOLD. QUALITY CATTLE SOLD WELL AND SLIGHTLY DEARER, SECONDARY CATTLE STRUGGLED AND BACKGROUNDER BUYERS WERE STRONG IN THE MARKET. INTERSTATE PROCESSORS WERE ACTIVE IN THE COW MARKET.

YEARLING STEERS C2 SCORE
200 TO 280 KGS SOLD TO 396 TO AVERAGE 367 OR $911 280 TO 330 KGS SOLD TO 394 TO AVERAGE 361
330 TO 400 KGS SOLD TO 408 TO AVERAGE 356
OVER 400 KGS SOLD TO 360 TO AVERAGE 330

YEARLING HEIFERS C2 SCORE

200 TO 280 KGS SOLD TO 274 TO AVERAGE 267 280 TO 330 KGS SOLD TO 310 TO AVERAGE 247 330 TO 400 KGS SOLD TO 298 TO AVERAGE 269 OVER 400 KGS SOLD TO 288 TO AVERAGE 244

COWS UNDER 520 KGS

D2 COWS SOLD TO 220 TO AVERAGE 185 D3 COWS SOLD TO 242 TO AVERAGE 228

COWS OVER 520 KGS
D3 COWS SOLD TO 250 TO AVERAGE 230 OR $1292

BULLS OVER 600 KGS SOLD TO 270 TO AVERAGE 235 OR $2550

THIS IS CHARLES WEYMAN JONES IN ROMA

NZ throws livestock methane tax out the window; producers celebrate

New Zealand’s new centre-right government has formally ditched the controversial methane tax on livestock in a move that Kiwi farmers are heralding as a sign of common sense.

The former Labor government under Jacinda Ardern made a name for itself with the plan to tax farmers according to the size of their land, the amount of livestock they own, their overall production and their use of nitrogen fertiliser in a bid to make a whole-of-economy mid-century net zero goal.

Nationwide protests from farmers followed and The National Party went to last year’s election with a promise to remove agriculture emissions from the Emissions Trading Scheme.

This week, the government, which has been in power since November, confirmed the methane tax was gone and it would instead establish a new Pastoral Sector Group to constructively tackle biogenic methane.

Agriculture Minister Todd McClay said NZ farmers were some of the world’s most carbon-efficient food producers.

Kiwi producers had been arguing that since Ardern first trotted out the ‘world-first’ tax, which she planned to start next year.

Smo-King business on a high for an Inverell family

Darren and Sigourney Keyte of Smo-King Barbecues, Inverell, has moved from a butcher with more than 20 years of experience to running a professional barbecue business.

A rise in cattle prices and the impact of the drought helped Mr Keyte manage the change from running a butcher shop in Inverell to catering at the local markets, cooking steak sandwiches to help cover costs.

These pressures on their business from drought and increased costs included a decline from processing 12 bodies a week back to four to five carcases a week. Something had to give.

He said the change in business direction they experienced quickly escalated.

Before they knew it, their catering business was nearly as busy as the butcher shop, with only a few free weekends left on a busy calendar.

They now cover an area which ranges from Newcastle in the south and up into southern Queensland, and across New England and the Northwest.

Last Chance to have your say on Local Land Services Boards

Local Land Services is reminding rural landholders to vote now before it is too late to have their say in local board elections.

Local Land Services Executive Director Regional Delivery James Hutchinson-Smith said voting was one way to help ensure your local board reflected the needs of your region.

Mr Hutchinson says, ‘Our boards and regions help make us unique and ensure we maintain local connections to the communities we service,’

Elections are being held in each of the 11 Local Land Services regions to fill 34 roles.

Value of beef sent to Indonesia outstrips live cattle exports for first time.

Australia exported $564.7 million worth of beef and veal to Indonesia in 2023, up more than 45 per cent year-on-year.

In the same time period, Indonesia imported $410m of Australian feeder cattle.

A rebounding hotel, restaurant and catering trade drove the demand for beef imports while there were disruptions to the live export trade including suspended Australian facilities in relation to lumpy skin disease concerns

Cool change heats up lamb prices in NSW saleyards.

A boost to lamb prices at big selling centres such as Wagga Wagga and Carcoar has resulted in a 25 cent a kilogram lift to the NSW Trade Lamb Indicator in the past week.

The indicator was on 718c/kg just before the King’s Birthday long weekend, which was also more than 50c/kg higher than the same time a month earlier.

A big portion of the contribution to the indicator in the past week has been at the heavier end of the range, from 24kg to 26kg, as buyers pick up the quality pens before winter really starts to affect quality and supply.

The supply of lambs dipped by 9050 head at Wagga on Thursday for a yarding of 34,000 head.

Chickpea plant to pass 800,000 ha; get ready for the agronomic challenges.

The Indian government’s removal of a 68 per cent tariff on Australian chickpeas has supercharged the planting of northern Desi chickpeas, with estimates that more than 800,000 hectares will be grown.

Pulse Australia’s Northern Region agronomist and industry development manager Ian McIntyre welcomes the interest shown in the crop but raised the topic of agronomical preparedness during sessions of the annual Crop Consultants Australia seminar at Tamworth.

Mr McIntyre said 2016’s wet year and the planting of 1.3 million hectares of Desi chickpeas still haunt him when he recalls the problems with fungicide shortages and damage by Ascochyta blight and Botrytis cinerea or botrytis grey mould (BGM)

Plans for a $60 million upgrade to Bourke abattoir

The company behind the Bourke abattoir has kicked off a $60 million capital works program which will allow the plant to process up to 6000 head of goats per day.

Thomas Foods International acquired the mothballed facility in 2021.

It had been briefly operational when it was first constructed before sitting dormant.

Chief executive Anthony Stewart said the initial focus was carrying out upgrades for the plant to be recommissioned

Mr Stewart said it had been a challenge to build the workforce, but it now comprised of about 200 people of nine nationalities who were all based in the town.

Currently the abattoir is processing goats, both from the local area and further afield, but the plant was also licensed for sheep and lambs.

The capital works program would allow the facility to process up to 6000 head a day

Markets analyst predicts dramatic livestock rises by 2026 on short supply.

Australian sheep and cattle are undervalued with some dramatic price rises to come in the next two years according to Global AgriTrends market analyst Simon Quilty.

The guest speaker at the Mackillop Farm Management Group’s Beef and Sheep Outlook at Padthaway last week made some bold predictions including feeder steers taking “three steps forward and two steps back” in 2024 but then rising to $4.90 a kilogram in 2025 and peaking at $6.30/kg in 2026 and nearly the same at $6.20/kg in 2027.

He said the Eastern Young Cattle Indicator was also set for a sustained rise with an average of $9.54/kg in 2025, up to $12.77/kg in 2026, $12.46/kg in 2027 and $10.77/kg in 2028.

And unlike previous short term spikes he expects high beef prices will become the “new norm”, with a seven year period of stable prices from 2025 to 203

Foreign voters to shape Australian farmers future as far right rocks Europe

Ballot boxes in foreign lands could direct the fate of Australian agriculture over coming years as much as domestic policy if the rise of extreme conservative populism armed with protectionist policies alters foreign market access.

Around 72 per cent of Australia’s total value of agricultural, fisheries and forestry production heads overseas, with the export orientation of each industry varying by commodity type.

Large sectors, like wheat and beef ship out at least 70pc of what is produced, sugar 84pc, mutton and lamb nearly 80pc and rice 90pc, while less export-focused commodities still export significant shares of production, including dairy (40pc) and horticulture (33pc).

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